Book Review: The Last Straw – Ed Duncan (an honest review)

The Last Straw – Ed Duncan

Score
Published 2017 by Creativia
Number of pages: 220

An honest review in exchange for a free copy
Thank you Kelsey Butts of Book Publicity Services for connecting me with the author, and thank you Ed Duncan for kindly sending me a copy of your book for a review.
2019 Challenge – A book that is under 220 pages

It started with a run-of-the-mill carjacking. An inner-city kid with no priors and no experience with a gun fumbled the ball, and the driver ended up dead. Unfortunate for all concerned, but not uncommon. But there was more – a lot more.
A teenage girl witnessed the whole thing, and a Chicago crime boss with no apparent motive was willing to move heaven and earth to prevent her from testifying. But why? No one knew except him and he didn’t have to say.
Richard “Rico” Sanders was the crime boss’s first choice for the job. He was the best in the business but there was a problem. He was a “killer with a conscience” and a killer with a conscience doesn’t murder teenagers. John D’Angelo, the crime boss’s second choice, had no such qualms. There was bad blood between him and Rico, so knowing that Rico had passed on the job, he eagerly accepted it. Then he bungled it by mistakenly killing the girl’s father.
Paul Elliott, a respected attorney and a close friend of the girl’s family happened to be present when her father was gunned down while walking her home from school. Paul and Rico, from different sides of the tracks, had an unusual history together. A year earlier Paul had saved Rico’s life and Rico hadn’t forgotten. So when a vengeful D’Angelo, with help from two confederates, set his sights on both men, they were drawn together in an uneasy alliance against a common foe.

 

Although The Last Straw can be read as a standalone, the book mentioned a major event in the past connecting Rico (my absolute fav!) and Paul and in order to understand it better I do think it is best to start with book #1 (Check it out on Goodreads  Pigeon-Blood Red)

Anyway, I was immediately drawn to the story when I read the blurb. Action, thrill and mystery – it seemed to have it all.

Ed Duncan’s world building is extremely impressive. They way he describes the characters and the surroundings to the fine detail was very enjoyable to read (and it made it imagining the “book-world” rather easy, too!) The characters felt real and the dialogues weren’t forced.

I was left exasperated by the scene at The Five Aces. No doubt highlighted intentionally by the author, but uncomfortable nevertheless.

I was disappointed that the book ended so abruptly. Would I read it again? Probably not. However, I would definitely read another book by him.

Find out more about the author https://eduncan.net/

SPOILER ALERT

The more I think about it, the less I like the ending. All of a sudden everything fell conveniently into place and frankly a lot of what happened in the story was in vain the way it ended.

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